The Healing Power of San Lazaro

via The Healing Power of San Lazaro – Voodoo Universe

The Healing Power of San Lazaro

San Lazaro (O Yo Soy La Ruta) by Jose Bedia photo by Nathania Johnson licensed under CC 2.0.

December 17th is the Feast of San Lazaro. This saint is associated with the Orisha Babalu Aye in the La Regla Lucumi (Santeria) tradition. Michael Atwood Mason on the Smithsonian.com blog writes of this king “in the African-inspired religious tradition known as Santería …, Babalú-Ayé is both feared and beloved. Thought to be responsible for bringing epidemics like smallpox, leprosy and AIDS, Babalú-Ayé also cures these diseases. Oricha elders tell of his exile from his homeland with the Lucumí because he spread smallpox among them…. They tell of his journey to the Arará, who were healed by him and ultimately made him their king.”

Babalu Aye is the God of sickness, of infectious disease, and consequently of healing. His name has been translated as the “king who hurts the world.” Babalu Aye is worshiped under many different names. His name is Sonponno among the Yoruba, and Sakpata or Sagbata among the Fon of West Africa. Some believe his name is so sacred it is not to be spoken.

Babalu Aye performs miracles and transformational healings. This video from Yoruba Andabo tells of this Orisha’s great power.

Someone has turned this Beethoven symphony into an extraordinary Cuban rumba | Classic FM

Someone has turned this Beethoven symphony into an extraordinary Cuban rumba

By Amy MacKenzie, 19th December 2016, 09:51

Never thought you’d find yourself dancing along to Beethoven? This performance will have you toe-tapping in no time.
If there ever was a truly extraordinary cover of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7, then this is it.

Award-winning composer, orchestrator and talented performer Joachim Horsley has stunned us with his sunny arrangement Beethoven in Havana. Composed for eight performers on three pianos, including a percussion accompaniment and some extended techniques, we would love to see this piece performed live.

via Someone has turned this Beethoven symphony into an extraordinary Cuban rumba | Classic FM

Cuban Rumba will Sing to Fidel Castro for UNESCO Declaration

 

http://www.cubamusic.com/Store/Album/07000340/yoruba-andabo/soy-de-la-tierra-brava
Matanzas, Cuba, Dec 10 (Prensa Latina) The Rumba, declared by UNESCO as Immaterial World Heritage of the Humanity, will dedicate the celebration for the declaration on December 11th to historic leader of the Cuban Revolution Fidel Castro, said sources today.

During the inter-governmental committee held in Ethiopia, the Rumba, musical rhythm of deep African roots, joined the list of UNESCO Cultural Heritage.

Officials from the Heritage Council of Cuba dedicated this achievement to Fidel Castro for his crucial role for outlining the Cuban cultural policy since the first years of the Revolution, began on January 1st, 1959.

Diosdado Ramos, director of Los Muñequitos, one of the emblematic and oldest groups of Rumba in Matanzas, said ‘we will sing to our Commander and the name of Rumba will shine.’

The ceremony will be held at the Patio Colonial in this city, located 100 kilometers east from Havana, with the presence of groups that will perform during 5 hours on Sunday evening.

via Cuban Rumba will Sing to Fidel Castro for UNESCO Declaration

Africa in the Americas: Tour Group Explores Cuba’s African Roots – NBC News

 

http://www.cubamusic.com/Store/Album/07000340/yoruba-andabo/soy-de-la-tierra-brava 

PlayFacebook Twitter Google Plus Embed
Traveling Noire: Cuba Comes ‘Alive’ 3:31
When the United States and Cuba first announced plans to restore diplomatic relations two years ago, Kasara E. Davidson says she and her business partner “hit the ground running” and used their combined 20 years of experience with the island to start Diaspora Enterprise Solutions (DiasporaES).

“It was an opportunity for us to learn Cuba even more and an opportunity for us to share what we know about Cuba with others,” said Davidson, who is the company’s co-owner and managing director.

The East Coast based business creates professional, educational and cultural programs for individuals, groups and organizations in cities around the world.

Since its founding about a year and a half ago, DiasporaES has focused mainly on Cuba— successfully taking several groups to the island under several of 12 permitted categories that have made it easier for more Americans to travel there.

Three backup dancers pose for a photo pose for a shot on their break in Havana, Cuba. Mikhael Simmonds
With the d

via Africa in the Americas: Tour Group Explores Cuba’s African Roots – NBC News

Dominican Merengue, Cuban Rumba Named Cultural Heritages of Humanity – NBC News

 

http://www.cubamusic.com/Store/Album/07000340/yoruba-andabo/soy-de-la-tierra-brava

 

Dominican Merengue, Cuban Rumba Named Cultural Heritages of Humanity
by ERICKA N. HERNANDEZ
SHARE

If you love the wonderful beat of merengue music or the sounds of Cuban rumba, you’ll be happy to know they’re considered worldwide cultural treasures.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) added both musical genres to their Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity list.

“Dominican merengue plays an active role in many areas of daily life of the population’s education, social and friendly gatherings, festive events and even political campaigns”, declared UNESCO during its most recent annual meeting, as EFE reports. “Merengue attracts people of different social classes, which helps promote respect and coexistence among individuals, groups and communities,” states UNESCO on its website.

Cuban rumba “evokes a sense of grace, sensuality and joy that aims to connect people, regardless of their social and economic background, gender or ethnicity,” UNESCO states. “The practice of rumba in Cuba has been transmitted over generations by imitation within families and neighborhood.”

World famous merengue artists include Johnny Ventura, Miriam Cruz, Juan Luis Guerra, Los Toros Band and the Queen of Merengue, Milly Quezada.

Rumba artists that have helped established their popularity include Celia Cruz, Alberto Zayas, Carlos “Patato” Veldes, Pancho Quinto and Francisco Aguabella.

Merengue, of Afro-Caribbean origin, became more known after the late Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo promoted the musical genre around the country.

Rumba, with its rhythmic drumming and elaborate dancing, also traces back to African culture. It developed during the 19th century in cities such as Havana and Matanzas as well as in rural areas where Afro-Cubans lived.

via Dominican Merengue, Cuban Rumba Named Cultural Heritages of Humanity – NBC News

UNESCO adds Cuban rumba, Belgian beer to list of world’s ‘intangible’ heritage – France 24

http://m.france24.com/en/20161130-unesco-cuba-rumba-belgium-beer-list-intangible-world-heritage

Cuba’s sensual rumba dance and Belgium’s thriving beer culture brought a new exuberance to UNESCO’s prestigious list of “intangible” heritage on Wednesday.

The UN body gave the nod to the rumba, which it said evokes “grace, sensuality and joy”, while it said “making and appreciating beer is part of the living heritage… throughout Belgium,” which has more than 1,500 types.

The Cuban delegation to UNESCO talks in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa dedicated the rumba’s selection to longtime leader Fidel Castro, who died on Friday aged 90.

UNESCO said the rumba sprang from poor communities where the dance is an enduring “expression of resistance and self-esteem”.

Belgium meanwhile toasted the recognition, with French-speaking culture minister Alda Greoli noting that the country’s beer culture “has been handed down from generation to generation since time immemorial”.

Belgian beer’s “communal identity resulted in… an explosion of artisanal creativity and love for the brewing craft,” she said.

Her Flemish-speaking counterpart Sven Gatz said Belgium had won “the world cup of beer culture,” calling the nomination a “very nice reward for everyone who works in the sector”.

Whether Belgians drink beer to quench their thirst “after an exhilarating walk, during a friendly evening in the local pub, or as part of our gastronomy,” he said, “we have a suitable beer for every occasion”.

Belgium’s minority German-speaking community, which submitted the application, also hailed the nomination, saying it would “give Belgian beer culture even more gloss… around the world.”

The listing was “a reward for (Belgian enthusiasts’) efforts… to keep this rich beer culture alive,” it said in a statement.

Staying on the festive theme, the World Heritage Committee also enshrined the new year’s celebrations of 12 countries stretching from Turkey to India that fall on the March 21 vernal equinox and known as Nowruz in Iran.

The list of “intangible” cultural treasures was created 10 years ago, mainly to increase awareness about them, while UNESCO also sometimes offers financial or technical support to countries struggling to protect them.

On Tuesday, the UN body designated Ugandan traditional music, which is dying out partly because it requires materials from endangered species, as intangible heritage “in urgent need of safeguarding”.

UNESCO began compiling a list for cultural and natural world heritage — physical properties such as Cambodia’s Angkor Wat or the Grand Canyon in the United States — in 1972.

The list now comprises 814 cultural sites, 203 natural ones and 35 with both natural and cultural qualities such as Australia’s Uluru National Park, formerly known as Ayer’s Rock.

The committee winds up its review of nominations to the Representative Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity list on Thursday.

(AFP)

     

     

     

Cuba Aspires to Include Rumba at UNESCO Heritage List

Cuba Aspires to Include Rumba at UNESCO Heritage List
Paris, Nov 14 (Prensa Latina) Cuba is expecting UNESCO to include ”rumba” in its list – Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, during the forthcoming meeting of the Intergovernmental Committee on the issue, diplomatic sources said today.

According to the information provided to Prensa Latina by the Havana delegation at UNESCO, the event scheduled from November 28th to December 2nd in Ethiopia will decide on the inclusion of rumba as ‘a festive mixture of music and dance, and associated practices’.

UNESCO recognizes the value of rumba as an expressive style of music and dance that rests on forms of verbal communication (vocal singing and sounds) and non-verbal communication (gestures and body language).

Practiced in family circles, with neighbors and in communities in festive and religious events, rumba ‘mixes tradition and contemporaneity and promotes feelings of self-esteem and belonging among its practitioners,’ the text says.

‘It also brings together individuals of all sexes, social class, geographical origin or religious beliefs, reinforcing social cohesion, mutual respect and favoring harmonious relationships between individuals and communities.’

‘It highlights the diverse origin of rumba, with African, Spanish and African-Caribbean roots, which helps promoting respect for cultural diversity and human creativity.’

The 11th session of the Intergovernmental Committee for the Protection of the Intangible Cultural Heritage will begin in Addis Ababa in late November. It will analyze Cuba’s candidacy and other proposals from many countries.

via Cuba Aspires to Include Rumba at UNESCO Heritage List

Yoruba Andabo, the roots of Afro-Cuban music – Havana Music School

If we want to talk about the popular traditions of Cuban music, we have to talk about Yoruba Andabo.
This musical group is an example of versatility and authenticity in the representation of Cuban musical diversity.
“Working and create, that’s what we lose sleep. I think that we only end with the death. You can see that every Cuban will move his foot when he hears a Cuban conga”. – Geovani del Pino, Director

via Yoruba Andabo, the roots of Afro-Cuban music – Havana Music School